Jennifer Yello

 Jennifer Yello
Mentor: Dr. Charlene Krueger
College of Nursing
 
"I’ve always been really interested in being a part of a research team, but as a freshman, I had no idea how to go about doing any of it; it was intimidating to me and I didn't even really know what being on a research team entailed. But, I’m extremely curious and I love exploring new topics and finding new ways to approach situations. I've always had a special place in my heart for pediatrics and one night, when I started to do some research into Dr. Krueger’s published work, I fell in love with her areas of interest. After I approached her about possibly becoming part of her research team, we set up a meeting and I began training! Research has allowed me to see a whole new part of nursing that I never even knew existed and I am so excited to move forward in our projects. At the moment, we have a few projects that we are working on as a team, and are eager to present at the SNRS Convention (Southern Nursing Research Society) this year! As I’m currently in nursing school here at UF, I love being able to simultaneously assist in research collecting as well as do clinical work! I am excited to see where research will take me in the future!"

Major

Nursing

Minor

Educational Studies

Research Interests

  • Learning in the Premature Infant
  • Mother-Baby Relationship
  • Psychosocial Problems

Academic Awards

  • UF University Scholars Program
  • Central Florida Women's League Scholarship
  • UF President's Honor Roll
  • Florida Bright Futures Medallion Scholar
  • College of Nursing Alumni Council book Awards Scholarship

Organizations

  • Alpha Epsilon Delta

Volunteer

  • United Way's Reading Pals Program
  • Shands Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Clinical Trials Office
  • Alachua County's Food 4 Kids Program

Hobbies and Interests

  • Working as a Medical Assistant
  • Cooking & Baking
  • Canoeing
  • Reading

Research Description

Heart Rate Variability and Learning in the Premature
In this study, we focus on premature infants, delivered at 28-34 weeks gestational age and the influence of maternal voice and stimulation while in the NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit). Using heart rate variability, we will attempt to see the effect maternal voice has on the infant’s autonomic nervous system development, as well as attempt to look at the infant’s higher level of thinking, which will allow us to determine the amount of weeks it takes for a preterm infant to acknowledge maternal voice over the voice of a stranger. Overall, we are aiming to try and change the standard of care in the NICU and facilitate more proper care of the infant while recovering in the NICU, by utilizing mother’s voice, which is a simple and inexpensive method, that may prove to be extremely rewarding.