Stephen Gibbs

Stephen Gibbs
Mentor: Dr. Carlos Rinaldi
College of Engineering
 
"Initially I wanted to get involved in research to gain real lab experience so I would look competitive to potential employers. However, I have gained much more out of my lab than just an item to put on my resume. I have formed many great relationships with intelligent students and professors who are always willing to help and teach me. I have also gained a lot of satisfaction from being able to apply what I've learned in the classroom to real life situations. By taking on my own project, I have learned a lot about the responsibilities, setbacks, and benefits of working in the research field."

Major

Chemical Engineering

Minor

Spanish

Research Interests

  • Materials Science
  • Biomedical Applications

Academic Awards

  • University Scholars Program
  • UF Honors
  • John V. Lombardi Scholar
  • President's List
  • UF College of Engineering Dean's List

Organizations

  • Freshman Leadership Engineering Group (FLEG)
  • AIChE

Volunteer

  • IMPACT Autism

Hobbies and Interests

  • Intramurals (Football, Basketball, Volleyball)
  • Traveling
  • Reading

Research Description

Synthesis of Manganese Zinc Ferrite Magnetic Nanoparticles

Synthesis and suspension of magnetic nanoparticles to create a fluid that responds to a magnetic field, a so-called “ferrofluid,” has opened the door to various biomedical applications. Among these are: targeted drug delivery, improvements to Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI), and nanoscale energy delivery through heat dissipation just to name a few. With such diverse possibilities in this fluid frontier, it is essential to optimize performance for each unique application. Thus, the necessity for a variety of particles with particular characteristics arises. By using our lab’s knowledge of the synthesis of monodisperse Iron Oxide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition (Park et al., 2004). I plan to synthesize Manganese Zinc Ferrite (MZF) nanoparticles by the same method in order to improve ferrofluid performance in certain biomedical applications.